Negative Space in Asian Art and Cooking

(Updated, 2/1/17:  fixed broken links) If you came to read about food and cooking, bear with me in this post. I’ll get to that subject in a few lines. Recently I visited the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco to see a survey of Japanese painting called “Traditions Unbound: Groundbreaking Painters of 18th-Century Kyoto.” It featured […]

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Inspired by nature or a tube of paint?

In the post about the swooping crow in L.A., I mentioned the art of Ellsworth Kelly and how he might have been inspired by shapes in nature and the human-built environment. Roy Lichtenstein, however, thinks that Kelly’s paintings are only about shape and color. In Michael Kimmelman‘s Portraits (highly recommended, BTW), Mr. Kimmelman concludes a […]

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Ocean Park through My Own Eyes

When I lived near Washington, D.C., I visited many of the great museums along the East Coast (the National Gallery, the Met, Philadelphia Museum, etc.). Each time I was sure to look in the 20th century section for works by Richard Diebenkorn, especially his monumental Ocean Park series (for example, #19, #49, #54, #70). The […]

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Temple Guardians in Thailand

Some of my favorite architectural features of Thai buildings are the creatures on the roofline: birds and serpents that guard boundaries of the sacred structures. The chofas (sometimes spelled chofah, cho fa, or cho fah) are bird guardians and live on the peaks of each gable. In areas with many religious buildings, like the Wat […]

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